Week 3 2016: Hi everyone! and the girls are back!

So what’s happening on the farm this week?
Week 3: Hi everyone! and the girls are back! they got back late Saturday night

We look forward to farming with you this season.

Peace, your farmers, Christine, Adam, Sadie, Delia, Ashlyn and Mary Kelsey

What’s in the share this week:

This  list is what is in a  full share this week.  Things may change between Monday and Thursday and Individual and Salad share will get differing amounts and may not get everything on the list. Lettuce heads, bok choy. lettuce mix, hakerei salad turnips, sugar SNAP PEAS, mountain mint, fresh herbs of your choice

 

Farm Fresh Raw milk for Sale

We are very lucky to have two milking cows – Annie and Maggie – both give us plenty of milk each and every day and we would like to share that with you and anyone else would like to have raw milk.  We sell it $5 a half gal.  We also can do a sliding scale if needed for the milk.  You can buy milk at CSA pickup or anytime out of our barn fridge next to our house at 34 quaker.

 

Eggs for sale We have the pretty girls’ eggs for sale – these are free-range, certified organic chicken eggs that are brown eggs– with the brightest yellow/orange yolks you ever seen.  The eggs are $6.00 a dozen.  $3.00 half dozen ***FRESH CERTIFIED ORGANIC whole CHICKEN AVAILABLE at the FARM  NOWJ

Recipes:

Garlic scapes are the “flower stalks” of hardneck garlic plants, although they do not produce flowers. These stalks start to appear a month or so after the first leaves. They are usually cut off of the plant, since leaving them on only diverts the plants strength away from forming a plump bulb. If left on, they eventually form small bulbils that can be planted to grow more garlic, but it takes 2–3 years for them to form large bulbs. Along the same lines, young garlic plants that are pulled to thin a row are referred to as “green garlic”. Used in the same manner as green onions, these too make excellent eating. All garlic varieties produce a stem, but it’s the hardneck Rocombole garlics that send out the curling scapes that gave them the nickname ‛serpent garlic’. There are many types of Rocombole and the flavor of the scapes can vary considerably from variety to variety, just as with garlic bulbs. But if you have a favorite variety of garlic that grows well in your garden, you will probably enjoy its scapes. Some of the more popularly grown varieties of Rocombole garlic include: ‘Carpathian’, ‘German Red’ and ‘Spanish Roja’.  http://gardening.about.com/od/herbsatoz/a/What-Are-Garlic-Scapes.htm

 

Top 6 things you can do with Scapes  

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/06/the-crisper-whisperer-what-to-do-with-garlic-scapes-recipe.html

1. Scape Pesto

Far and away my favorite use for garlic scapes is pesto, either straight-up or mixed with herbs like basil and dill. Pesto showcases raw scapes in all their glory. Scape pesto can be very pungent, but it mellows substantially after a few months in the freezer. I like it best in the middle of winter, but I think that’s one part mellowing and two parts deprivation.

2. Grilled Scapes

Another great, and very different, way to showcase scapes is to grill them, tossed with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper, over direct heat for about two minutes. Flip them once, halfway through, and finish with an extra sprinkle of flaky salt and maybe a bit of lemon juice and zest. They’ll be charred in spots and just soft enough, and their flavor will have sweetened and mellowed dramatically. Grilled scapes are surprisingly reminiscent of asparagus, and surprisingly different from raw scapes.

3. Scape Hummus

For the same reason they work well in pesto, scapes are a brilliant swap-in for garlic in your favorite homemade hummus. I think they work especially well in a lemony, tahini-free hummus, which really gives them a chance to shine. Edamame “hummus” with scapes works nicely too, and color coordination is tough to argue with.

4. Scape Compound Butter

Scapes would make a lovely compound butter with a little lemon and maybe some fresh thyme. You could use the butter to make a tarted-up garlic bread, and I can’t think of much (except maybe fruit—I do have some boundaries) that could be tossed on the grill but not finished with a nice slice of this melting goodness.

5. Scapes as aromatic

To take a more utilitarian approach, you can slice scapes to whatever length you like and use them as you would garlic, as an aromatic in a wide variety of recipes. Scapes lose a lot of their bite when sautéed, more so than garlic cloves, so use at least three or four times as much scape-age as you would clove-age.

6. Scapes as vegetable

Scapes also work well as a vegetable, cut into lengths and added to stir-fries or blanched and added to salads, much as you might use green beans. They’re chameleons among vegetables, I tell you, though not karma chameleons. Karma-wise, they’re all good.

 

 

Sesame Maple Sugar Snap Peas

http://humanresources.vermont.gov/sites/dhr/files/Documents/Wellness/Vigor_Spring-2014-ASO.pdf

1/2 lb sugar snap peas cleaned and strings removed

1 teaspoon sesame oil

2 teaspoons Vermont maple syrup

1 tablespoon white sesame seeds

salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

Blanch cleaned sugar snap peas in boiling water for one minute and drain. Combine remaining ingredients in a sauté pan and toss in blanched peas stir and continue cooking on medium heat for 2 minutes.Serve!

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