So what’s happening on the farm this week? Week 4

Week 4: First, we’d like to say a big shout out to our Monday crew of volunteers! We finally have all the garlic, broccoli, red and green cabbage weeded and its growing like crazy. We picked the first of our zucchinis for you all today. CSA members will get them all this week and next week we might bring some to market if we have enough. Next week we should also start having summer squash tooJ We took the row cover off our collards, chard, red Russian kale in the back field and its doing amazing – the one wet spot on the northern end of the field needs a little TLC but overall looks great (oh and we could probably do some weeding too;) )One of the big projects this week is to do some heavy pruning and trellising of the hoophouse tomatoes – we have three houses full of them. If you would like to come and help – please let us know – it gets warm in these houses so early mornings, evenings, late in the day trellising. We finished getting all the peppers and eggplants in last week thanks to Sheila and her crew J The fields are starting to dry a bit more and we can finish transplanting soon and start planting fall crops (!). The corn plants are looking great. The beets and carrots are growing but need some weeding..and I am thankful for the sun today and yesterday. The sugar snap peas are still growing strong – our second crop which is bigger and I am told even sweeter will be ready mid week.

I think I have shared this before, often while I am picking on a Monday morning – I hope we have enough for everyone – and usually, we do. That moment of panic of do we have enough of this or that starts to run through my brain. I worry about do we have enough diversity in the share this week. Do we have enough veggies? Why isn’t more stuff ready yet? Take the weather in stride, the raised beds are working, the sun needs to shine. It will be ok.

I remind myself often of the fish and loaves story from the bible – that if I have faith, there will be enough.

Have a great week.

We look forward to farming with you this season.

Peace, your farmers, Christine, Adam, Sadie, Frank and Julia

 

What’s in the share this week:

This list is what is in a full share this week. Things may change between Monday and Thursday and Individual and Salad share will get differing amounts and may not get everything on the list. lettuce mix, big and juicy red russian kale, hakerei salad turnips (full share), sugar snap peas, good ole collards, first of the season zucchini

 

Farm Fresh Raw milk for Sale

We are very lucky to have two milking cows – Annie and Maggie – both give us plenty of milk each and every day and we would like to share that with you and anyone else would like to have raw milk. We sell it $5 a half gal. We also can do a sliding scale if needed for the milk. You can buy milk at CSA pickup or anytime out of our barn fridge next to our house at 34 quaker.

 

Eggs for sale We have the pretty girls’ eggs for sale – these are free-range, certified organic chicken eggs that are brown eggs– with the brightest yellow/orange yolks you ever seen. The eggs are $5.75 a dozen. $3.00 half dozen

***FRESH CERTIFIED ORGANIC whole CHICKEN AVAILABLE at the FARM TODAY***

Recipes:

IDEAS FOR COLLARDS (and other) GREENS (like kale and chard)

Dressing for cooked greens: warmed walnut oil, red wine vinegar, and chopped toasted walnuts. (from Belk’s “Around the Southern Table”)

Another method for serving leftover collards: Heat in a skillet with roasted peanuts and crushed red peppers. Brown diced ham in the skilled first, then add the greens, peanuts, and peppers, and serve over rice.

Main dish salad idea: Mix drained cooked beans with cooked collards and dress with oil and vinegar.

Simple Collards: Cook 3 cups (1/2 pound) collard leaves. Dress with 2 Tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, 2 teaspoons rice vinegar, and 2 minced garlic cloves. Season with salt and cayenne or black pepper. Serve with rice and corn bread.

Sausage and Collards over Polenta from Chef Jonathan Miller www.eatrightfromhome.com

1 cup polenta (coarse ground yellow corn)
4 cups water
salt
½ cup parmesan or romano, grated
1 bunch collards
olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 sweet red pepper, diced
3/4-1lb spicy sausage (preferably smoked)
3 garlic cloves, minced
dry oregano
1 lb tomatoes, peeled (or not) and chopped

Bring the water to a boil and gradually sprinkle in the polenta, whisking constantly to avoid lumping, and return the mixture to a low simmer. Continue stirring regularly so no lumps form, and cook over low heat until completely cooked, about 30 minutes. Fold in salt and the cheese and keep warm. While the polenta cooks, rinse the collards then slice them thinly, discarding stems. Heat some olive oil in a saucepan and add the onion and sweet pepper until lightly browned and softened, about 5 minutes over high heat. Dice one sausage and add it to the onions with the garlic and a generous pinch of dry oregano. Heat through and add about a cup of water, then the collards. Give them a hit of salt and cover, stirring occasionally, until the collards are tender, about 15 minutes. Brown the remaining sausage and slice into thin rounds. Add them with the tomatoes to the collards and heat through for another 5 minutes or so. Mound the polenta on a serving plate and top with the collard/sausage mixture.
Citrus Collards with Raisins adapted from: Grub: Ideas for an Urban Organic Kitchen by Anna Lappé and Bryant Terry

Coarse sea salt
2 large bunches collard greens, cut into chiffonade (long thin ribbons)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
2/3 cup raisins
1/3 cup fresh orange juice

Bring 3 quarts of water to boil in a large pot over high heat and add 1 tablespoon salt. Add the collards and cook, uncovered, for 8 to 10 minutes, until softened. Prepare a large bowl of ice water to cool the collards. Remove the collards from the heat, drain, and plunge them into the ice water to stop the cooking and set the color. Drain. Warm the olive oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Add the collards, raisins, and a 1/2 teaspoon salt. Sauté for 3 minutes, stirring frequently, until the raisins are plump. Do not overcook—the collards should be bright green. Add the orange juice and cook for an additional 15 seconds. Season with additional salt to taste if needed and serve immediately.

Collard Greens Braised Adapted from Cooks Country

1 Tablespoon olive oil
1 Tablespoon butter
1 leek or 1 small onion, chopped
1 bunch collard greens, stemmed and chopped (rinsed well first of course)
½ cup vegetable or chicken broth
1-2 teaspoons brown sugar
½ teaspoon salt
Pinch red pepper flakes
1 Tablespoon mild vinegar: champagne or cider

Heat 1 Tablespoon oil in large sauce pan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Saute onion until soft, 3-4 minutes. Add half of the greens, broth, sugar, salt, and cayenne. Cover and cook until greens are beginning to wilt, about 1 minute. Stir in remaining greens and cook, covered, stirring occasionally over med low heat until quite tender, about 30 minutes. Remove lid and cook over med high heat until liquid is almost evaporated, about 5-10 minutes. Off heat, stir in butter, vinegar, and serve.

Zucchini and Chickpeas
adapted from Mediterranean Vegetables by Clifford Wright

2 T olive oil
1 pound young zucchinis, trimmed and sliced about ½ inch thick
16 oz can chickpeas, drained
2 large garlic cloves, chopped
S & P to taste
2 T finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat and cook the zucchini, chickpeas, garlic, salt and pepper until the zucchini are slightly soft, about 20 minutes. Toss with the parsley and serve hot or at room temperature. Makes 4 servings

SPICY RICE AND KALE from Bon Appétit

2 1/4 cups chicken broth or vegetable broth
1 1/2 teaspoons Creole or Cajun seasoning
1 cup white rice
4 ounces kale (about 1/2 large bunch), leaves coarsely chopped (2 cups
packed)

Bring broth and Creole seasoning to boil in heavy large saucepan. Stir in rice and kale and bring to
boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook until rice is tender and liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes

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